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6 Inspiring People Who Made A Career Change from Warehousing to Information Technology

6 Inspiring People Who Made A Career Change from Warehousing to Information Technology

It’s another shift on the night crew. The last time they saw the sun, it was setting; the next time will be when it’s rising. Their muscles complain as they do their work, the strain across their shoulders is a familiar companion.

They’ve gotten accustomed to this schedule. Heavy lifting, operating machinery, the cold echo of the stone floors, the fluorescent lighting. A nocturnal life. When was the last time they kissed their partner goodbye over breakfast?

Sound familiar?

A lifestyle and taxing job on the body can only sustain so long. We can hear your inner thoughts begging for something new. But we get it–career changes can be daunting! It’s hard to figure out where to turn, where to look for an opportunity that will challenge you in new ways and provide a more sustainable future.

I.T. is a field that is always changing and adapting, and I like to think a little of that rubs off on those who take on the trade.

Adaptability will take you far. Let’s take a look at 6 game-changers who decided it was time to end their warehouse careers and learn how to break into I.T.

#1

From a Chemical Operator constantly exposed to danger to an Operations Engineer at Google

Keron Taylor was working as a Chemicals Operator at BASF, one of the world’s largest chemical companies. His job included driving forklifts, unloading tankers, and running multiple chemical reactions, which regularly exposed him to danger. When Keron cracked his wrist in a non-work-related accident, it set him on a new path.

He was scrolling across Facebook, was caught by Terry’s webinar, and enrolled in the Zero to Engineer program right there. By Module 4, he gained the confidence to apply for entry-level I.T. jobs and landed a contract position with Modis as an Operations Engineer at Google. What he learned in Zero To Engineer was right at the front of his mind though all his interviews.

“My job duties went from putting my body in harm’s way to adding devices onto networks and porting fiber into racks. My routine is incredibly flexible now, and I’m constantly collaborating and working with employees across various teams.”

#2

From Forklift Operator to Junior Network Administrator in 16 months

Daniel Adams came from a position as a forklift operator for a chain manufacturing company. About a year and a half into his warehouse career, he was thinking about a change. “This isn’t what I want to do with the rest of my life.”

After deciding to get back into I.T. (he had studied it in high school), he came across a CompTIA Network+ ad online from NexGenT. A good deal for a new world of opportunity. After flying through the course, he knew he wanted to join the ZTE program and lean into his passion.

NexGenT is designed to get you I.T. experience without a degree.

“You can go into this having no experience whatsoever, and they [Zero to Engineer] lay it out so perfectly for you, it’s easy to understand.”

He was able to make the switch and land his first I.T. role in under 3 months!

At $17.50 an hour to start, (an improvement from his warehouse wages) Daniel was set to grow in his first role at Rutter’s as an IT Support Technician, and work his way up doing what he loves. Below is our interview with him after his first day on the job (about one year ago). Since the interview, Daniel has been promoted to Junior Network Administrator with Rutter’s Dairy Farms!

#3

From grueling night shifts to System Administrator – Goodbye, on-the-job injuries!

Logan Brindley was tired of lifting 5-gallon buckets of chains every day and working late nights away from home. Uneven sleeping schedules, physically harmful work—the whole nine yards.

He knew it was time for a change. He had sustained an on-the-job injury that accumulated into an apple-sized hematoma on his knee, leaving him out of work for a month.

Logan’s wife stumbled upon a way for him to get I.T. training and experience without a degree: NexGenT!

Logan had been making $19 an hour, but after an engaging interview process with Efusion Programming (in which he was able to show off what he learned from his online IT training), Logan would be accepting an offer for $21 an hour as a System Administrator.

#4

From Injured Assembly Technician to Inventory Technician at Microsoft

Jason Benson is currently an Inventory Technician at Microsoft. It was a challenging road to get there. After suffering a back injury–and reinjuring himself multiple times–as an assembly technician, he knew it was time to move on to greener pastures.

Jason was introduced to NexGenT and decided to take the leap an sign up – after all, his body was in no condition to continue the taxing warehouse work he had been doing. This newly opened door and job position created a better environment for supporting his wife and children. With a special needs child, his health and flexible schedule were becoming more important as he wanted to be present in the raising of his kids.

NexGenT has helped him design solid career goals that “brighten his quality of life.”

#5

From a disheartened warehouse worker to a Senior Network Engineer making 6 figures

When Kwame Ohemeng landed in the United States from Ghana, he expected to pick up his technology career right where he left off. But it wasn’t as simple as he thought it would be. In the U.S., companies required certifications to validate a person’s knowledge.

Even with all his experience, he ended up working in a warehouse for a company that manufactured air conditioners.

While he was searching for resources online, he came across one of the Zero to Engineer ads. The program was offering mentorship from world-class I.T. industry professionals.

Once he completed the Zero to Engineer program and had his certifications, he was better equipped at selling himself during job interviews.

After being deemed overqualified for the first position he interviewed for ($70,000 a year salary), he landed a job at PCM, a company with over 20,000 employees. Kwame stayed with PCM for 3 years before making the move to another company. He became the go-to person in the IT department—and even a valued mentor in the NexGenT advisor network.

#6

From hauling chains at a lumber mill to Network Technician

Before discovering the CompTIA Network+, Jake Stephens was working in a lumber mill hauling green chain with pieces of lumber that were up to 300 pounds. The Network+ course confirmed he wanted to take his training further and he joined the Zero To Engineer program.

Now, he’s a Network Technician for Feynman Group.

Jake started at $13 an hour, but after just 31-days, once he had gotten his CCNA and proven his skillset without having any previous I.T. experience, he asked for $18 an hour and was offered $20 an hour instead (Moral of the story: never be afraid to ask!)

Jake is no longer required to put a strain on his body to make ends meet. He uses what he learned in the Zero to Engineer program as the fundamentals in his work.

By making this career switch, Jake feels more secure in what he’s doing—no more temp jobs— and has confidence in his children’s futures and the opportunities he can provide for them, and himself.

What can we learn from these 6 move makers?

Each of these stories included either a major life event or injury striking before they finally made a career change. But what we can all learn from these hard workers, is you don’t have to wait to go after a dream. You don’t have to put it off until you have no other choice. You can make that choice right away. Your success is waiting for you to decide you are ready to go all in and change your career. And we know the snowball affect: change your career, change your happiness, your income, your life. If these students of Zero To Engineer were able to do it, so can you.

If you’re ready to make a change, reframe your life, start a new career, or dare to strive for security and fulfillment, NexGenT is here to help make that happen.

Whether you’re brand new to the field, feeling stuck at an entry level position, or wising to return to the world of I.T.–we have a place for you.

Ready to make the next move in your career by learning how to become a network engineer or cyber engineer? Reach out via our support chat and we’d be more than happy to discuss your options.

9 Companies Hiring IT Professionals Right Now

9 Companies Hiring IT Professionals Right Now

The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken up the U.S. job market, but not every industry has been impacted in the same way. While other sectors such as hospitality and tourism have seen a substantial downturn, the software and tech industries have remained relatively unaffected—thanks in no small part to most employees’ ability to work from home. 

According to the career website Dice.com, tech job postings in the first quarter of 2020 actually increased compared to Q1 2019, even accounting for the early effects of the pandemic. That’s good news for IT professionals who are looking for a new position right now, but worried about the potentially shaky job market.

The Dice Q1 2020 report also reveals some highly interesting trends about the U.S. tech job market right now. For example, states such as Texas, North Carolina, and Virginia have had surges in tech job posts in the last year—but the annual growth rates are even higher in some states that you wouldn’t think of as tech hubs, such as New Hampshire and Rhode Island. The full report is well worth your time to read, so check it out at the link above.

But with all that said, which companies are hiring IT professionals right now? In this article, we’ll discuss some of the top companies hiring IT professionals, along with some of the perks and benefits of working for each one.

1. ManTech

ManTech is an IT defense contractor and consulting firm that helps U.S. federal government clients in the domains of cyber security, big data analytics, enterprise IT and systems engineering. According to Glassdoor.com, ManTech is going through a “hiring surge” right now, which is excellent news for IT professionals currently on the market.

In 2019, ManTech was named by Washingtonian Magazine as one of the “50 Great Places to Work” in the Washington D.C. area. In particular, the survey listed ManTech as a “Great Workplace for Veterans”—no surprise, given that almost 50 percent of the company’s workforce served in the military.

2. Nokia

Like ManTech, Glassdoor has Nokia listed under its “hiring surge” for employees right now. As a major player in the telecommunications industry, Nokia is well-positioned to profit as 5G networks continue to roll out across the globe.

The good news is that Nokia is also a nice place to work: 84 percent of reviewers say they would recommend working at the company to a friend, and 87 percent approve of CEO Rajeev Suri. Particular highlights in Glassdoor reviews of Nokia include the friendly working culture and flexible working hours.

3. RingCentral

RingCentral calls itself “the leading provider of global enterprise cloud communications and collaboration solutions.” The company offers a cloud-based phone system for organizations to help boost users’ efficiency and productivity.

San Francisco Business Times and the Silicon Valley Business Journal have recently named RingCentral one of the “2020 Bay Area Best Places to Work,” based on traits such as work culture, management practices, and employee practices. The company also offers perks such as free breakfast and lunch, a company gym, and team-building exercises through athletics and volunteering.

4. TEKsystems

TEKsystems is an IT service management company that offers a wide variety of IT specialties. The company supplies IT staff to clients, helping them resolve their most pressing and challenging problems. The suite of TEKsystems services includes:

  • Data analytics & insights
  • Enterprise software applications
  • Cyber risk & security
  • DevOps & automation
  • Cloud enablement

The benefits for TEKsystem employees are highly competitive, including:

  • Blue Cross Blue Shield PPO, including 100 percent coverage for wellness visits
  • Parental and military leave
  • 20 days of vacation and 6 company holidays 
  • Financial perks such as 401(k) plans, profit-sharing plans, and tuition reimbursement

5. Citi

Citi is one of the world’s largest providers of consumer financial services, including bank accounts, credit cards, and mortgages. With millions of customers and offices in 160 countries, Citi’s IT infrastructure is mission-critical—now more than ever, as so much of the business world has migrated online.

Along with healthcare and 401(k) plans, Citi has been supportive of its workforce in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, the company announced that it would be giving $1,000 bonuses to employees who made less than $60,000, as well as letting workers take sick leave without needing to use their paid time off.

6. FedEx

FedEx is one of the world’s biggest delivery services companies. The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken up FedEx’s business in a good way: the company has hired thousands of drivers as online orders surge, and announced a new technology partnership with Microsoft in May to help get better business analytics and insights.

IT jobs are an essential part of FedEx’s worldwide logistics chain. Fortune magazine ranked FedEx as one of the top 100 companies to work for in 2019, citing the company’s extensive charitable work and help delivering food, supplies, and medicine to communities affected by natural disasters.

7. Costco

Costco is a wholesale retailer that operates hundreds of members-only warehouses across the U.S. and the world. As of 2020, Costco is the world’s second-largest retailer, behind only Walmart, and the 14th-largest U.S. corporation by revenue.

The company’s IT jobs are located at the corporate headquarters of Issaquah, Washington. Employee benefits include free membership to Costco stores and much more: in 2018, Indeed.com ranked Costco #1 on the list of best companies for compensation and benefits.

8. Amazon

Amazon is a multinational technology company that focuses on e-commerce, cloud computing, digital streaming, and artificial intelligence. It is included in the Big Four technology companies, along with Google, Apple, and Microsoft.

Amazon is on a major hiring spree right now as their business has shot up during shelter in place. Benefits depend on both role and location but typically include a retirement plan, health insurance, employee assistance program, paid time off, and discounted products. They also encourage growth for all employees and even have a program called Career Choice which will pre-pay up to 95% of tuition fees for schooling in high demand fields for employees looking to level up.

9. Walmart

Walmart is another company giant that is on a hiring spree. Although the majority of their positions are retail and warehousing, they also have many IT positions available. At the time of this writing, the listings for information technology related positions exceed 5000! Since the pandemic began, they have added over 150,000 people to their workforce and positions continue to be open and added. 

Walmart does offer the common 401k, health insurance, employee discount, educational grants, stock, PTO, advancement and more. Benefits are dependent upon role and location but it is clear that Walmart cares for their employees.

Edge Computing IoT Encrypted Traffic Analytics Networking

The companies listed above are all great places to work for—and even better, they’re currently searching for new IT employees. Think you can make the cut? Check out their career websites and start sending those resumes.

If you’re looking to kickstart your career as an IT professional, we can help with that too. NexGenT offers hands-on, military-grade education programs in network engineering and cyber security, without the need for previous IT experience or degree. We’ll prepare you for the IT job market with our real-world skills training curriculum, during which you’ll gain industry certifications and benefit from mentorship from industry professionals.

 

NexGenT’s Head of Career Service, Sam Stuber

NexGenT’s Head of Career Service, Sam Stuber

Sam Stuber heads NexGenT’s Career Service and Journey team (which she refers to as, “The Dream Team” as the teams’ goal is to help every student land their dream job). As the head of the Dream Team, Sam works with her all-star Career Service and Success Coaches to ensure that every student succeeds and lands their dream job.

Sam is driven by her belief that a good education is the key to a successful life. This makes her passionate about revolutionizing higher education to make it more accessible and affordable to all. 

Prior to NexGenT, Sam started a company that helped students afford higher education through scholarships and crowdfunding. During this time, Sam helped over 200 students gain access to scholarships that allowed them to attain a post-secondary education. Sam also worked as a Career and College counselor, helping over 4000 students navigate the uncertain time in their life from transitioning out of high school into college or their first career. 

Sam has a certificate in Career Planning and College Admissions from the University of California, Berkeley. She also has a Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration with a concentration in Entrepreneurship and a minor in English from California State University Fullerton (Go Titans!). 

A fun fact about Sam is that her goal is to go to every national park in the U.S.!


About NexGenT Career Service

Our NexGenT Career Service team works with you to develop your job attainment skills. We do this by first analyzing your individual strengths and weaknesses to build a custom career development plan. Your job success is so important that we dedicate a Career Success Coach to meet with you 1:1 to ensure you’re on track to reach your personal goals. Your Career Success Coach works with you to master each career milestone of a professional resume, cover letter, IT or cybersecurity interview preparation, a professional LinkedIn profile, and ultimately, a job and career success plan.

We look forward to helping you level up and achieve your career goals!

If you aren’t already a student, apply for NexGenT’s Full Stack Network Engineer program hereor NexGenT’s Cyber Security Specialist program here!

EXPLAINED: IT Job Security Clearances – An Expert Reveals the Secrets

EXPLAINED: IT Job Security Clearances – An Expert Reveals the Secrets

Everything you ever wanted to know about security clearance IT jobs (including sponsorship) but were too afraid to ask…

What do cops, members of the security services, and systems engineers have in common? All of these jobs often require a security clearance. So do network engineers, software architects, and even coders. 

The number of IT jobs that require clearance might surprise you. Often, it’s not the job itself, but the organization hiring you for the job. Database administrators who work for the military, for example, require clearance. Database administrators working for private companies might not. Most government agencies, who are super-paranoid about national security, require clearance before you even pull up a chair at the IT desk. 

One thing’s for sure: More IT roles require clearance than ever before. Nine percent of all job listings ask for clearance, and 50 percent of these positions are in the digital tech sector. A growing number of organizations require candidates to have clearance before applying for the role, but it’s not clear how many applicants do. 

Recently, in our Meet the Mentor webinar series, we spoke to senior cybersecurity engineer Dereck Watters, who provided us with some valuable insights into the top-secret world of security clearance. 

In this guide, you’re going to discover the following:

  • What kind of jobs require clearance.
  • The four different levels of clearance.
  • How to get your clearance sponsored. 
  • The different ways to obtain clearance.
  • How to pass a clearance.
  • Other insights from cybersecurity expert Dereck Watters. 

Let’s Clear Up Some Things About Clearance

A security clearance isn’t something you can pay for. Or study for. You need to earn it, the hard way. Think of it as a badge of honor. A medal that proves you can protect classified information. You’re a genuine “keeper of secrets.” Someone who won’t snitch, no matter what.

There’s a huge shortage of people who have the technical abilities to perform a job with clearance. But Watters tells us that, once you earn clearance, you’ll be made for life.

“You’re pretty much guaranteed a job,” he says. “Put your resume on Indeed, and a thousand people are going to call you.”

Because there’s such a small pool of job candidates with the required clearance for some jobs, employers are willing to pay big bucks.

“Once you get that established under your name, you’re pretty much guaranteed a position from the Department of Defense or the Navy or the Air Force.”

The federal government views clearance as a prerequisite for most jobs that protect national security. So many government agencies have been burned in recent years — data breaches, like those at the Office of Personnel Management, Department of Energy, and Department of Veterans Affairs have become commonplace — so now candidates need the right security credentials to preserve the country’s biggest secrets. 

It’s important to note that there isn’t just one type of security clearance, but four:

  • Confidential: For people that could cause damage to national security if sensitive information is disclosed without authorization. 
  • Secret: For people that could cause serious damage to national security if sensitive information is disclosed without authorization.
  • Top secret: For people that could cause exceptionally grave damage to national security if sensitive information is disclosed without authorization. 
  • Sensitive compartmented information: For people who could access information concerning sensitive intelligence sources, methods, or analytical processes. 

Once you’ve got clearance, you’re good for 15 years (10 years for secret clearance; five years for top-secret clearance). This means, in most instances, you won’t have to apply for clearance again for a whole decade or more.

There are a whole host of jobs that require some kind of clearance, especially in the government. Even if your job role has nothing to do with national security — “I’m just a software engineer,” you say — some agencies still require clearance, and not much you can do about it.

Some of the agencies that require clearance:

  • Central Intelligence Agency
  • Defense Intelligence Agency
  • Defense Security Service
  • Department of Defense
  • Drug Enforcement Administration
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • National Security Agency
  • Naval Criminal Investigative Service
  • State Department
  • United States Agency for International Development

Recommended reading: Why now’s a great time to consider a new career in cybersecurity

How to Get Your Clearance Sponsored

Unfortunately, clearance costs money — lots of it. It costs between $3,000 and $15,000 to gain top-secret clearance; however, the feds will sometimes cover the cost for civilian government employees and military personnel. This is called “sponsorship.” The good news: Once you’ve gained clearance from the government, you can use it for any job that requires it — yes, even private companies. 

Watters tells us there are four main ways to get your clearance sponsored:

  • Military
  • College
  • Part-time employment
  • Contracts

Military

This is the easiest way. Visit your nearest military processing center, and pick a military occupation code (MOS) that requires clearance. You can apply for this occupation, and the government will sponsor your clearance. It’s that simple. Just make sure you’re fit and healthy, and you have the correct scores for the role.

“You don’t have to do active military duty,” says Watters. “You could do the reserves if you don’t have much time. Or even the National Guard.”

College

Many colleges have government-sponsored programs that will pay for studies and security clearance. Sure, you’ll have to work for the government for a couple of years when you graduate (or pay a fee), but this can be a quick way to gain clearance if you don’t have the money. 

“Essentially, if you’re going for a STEM tech degree either in cybersecurity, system engineering, or electrical engineering, they will pay for your school, and they sponsor you for your clearance,” says Watters. “This is a quick way to get into a government position without actually putting on the uniform.”

Word of warning: There are specific time slots for when you can apply for these programs, so plan ahead. 

Part-time employment

There are jobs out there that will sponsor your clearance, but they won’t always be in IT. You could apply for a security job or a similar role and get sponsorship. Just look on Monster. Or USAJobs

“You could do this part-time,” adds Watters. “This gives you flexibility, and you get your clearance.” 

Contracts

Watters recommends that you look at how contracts are written for government contractors:

“If the government’s looking for a network engineer, some of the requirements are pretty weird. They will probably want you to have a CCNA, but they may also ask for a Microsoft server cert.”

It seems like a catch-all, but once you get to the interview stage, it’s a different story:  

“If you can hit some of those checkboxes — not all, but some of them — they might really like you and start the paperwork and clearance process. They will put the contract on hold until you are through clearance. The people interviewing you aren’t actually the people who write the contract.”

Recommended reading: From IT administrator to network engineer, check out our interview with Chris Mickinnis here.

How to Pass Clearance

Now comes the scary part. You might think there are skeletons in your closet, but your past isn’t always a huge deal. 

“We all have stuff in our past that we’re probably not too proud of but organizations are just looking for the things that you’re trying to keep secret from them,” says Watters. “Listen, most people think that because they smoked when they were 19, they are going to be disqualified. Investigators are not worried about anything like that. What they’re really concerned with is if you are a person that can be trusted with classified documents.”

The same goes for debt:

“They’re not looking for 800 credit scores. What they’re looking for is a person that’s trustworthy.”

A $50,000 debt in Guatemala that you didn’t disclose in your application? Potential red flag. A $4,000 debt for a TV from Best Buy? No problem.

“It’s hard to get people through the security clearance process because you need patience, and you have to have the honesty and integrity to put everything on paper. They are going to cycle through your life.”

How Long Does It Take?

How long is a piece of string? Clearance for government jobs can take anywhere from 3-6 months (and 6-18 months for top-secret clearance), and this process starts from the moment you turn in your Standard Form 86 — the document the government uses to “cycle through your life.” 

Once you’ve submitted Form 86, human resources will submit your details to the State Department’s Office of Personnel Security and Suitability, and this is where everything springs into action. Things will move quickly, at first. 

  • Someone will carry out a National Agency Check (NAC). It’s like a criminal record and credit check rolled into one, with searches covering your residence, employment, and education locations over the last 7 years. 
  • Someone will scan your fingerprints.
  • Someone will search the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigative index.

Then, you won’t hear anything for weeks. Maybe months. Eventually, a case manager will be assigned to your case, and you’ll be invited to an interview. This can be tough. The investigator will verify all the information you provided in your Form 86. Be prepared to answer questions, lots of questions. 

Where did you work? Where did you live? Where did you go to school? 

What do your parents do for work? Where did your parents live? Where did your parents go to school?

Investigators can check this information with law enforcement agencies, employers, and even school principals. No stone unturned.

It’s an exhausting process. 

“Look, if you can explain your background, then they are there OK with it,” says Watters. “As long as you can articulate why you have that much money, or why your wife is from there or husband from there, it’s fine.” 

After your interview, the investigator will weigh your results against security clearance guidelines. You’ll be notified of your results in the mail.

Now you play the waiting game.

Ask a Security Expert

In our Meet the Mentor webinar with Derick Watters, our students had some security clearance questions of their own…

How does a veteran get inside info about Department of Defense contracts?

“The biggest one is definitely word of mouth. If you see anyone on LinkedIn, just talk to them. Ask about open positions. Ask about clearance. Ask about sponsorship.”

What happens at the end of federal contracts?

“When the contract ends, they have to let you know. They have to discuss it with you up-front during the interview. Of course, you have to look for another position if the contract ends, but they need people with clearance so bad they will often keep you.”

What’s the most difficult thing about the clearance process?

“I have to get checked every 5 years. You know, sit down with somebody to explain why I bought a new house or car. I have to put my wife’s name down so she can get checked. Tell them about my family members. You have to get used to giving up a little bit of your privacy.”

Want to become a cybersecurity specialist in as little as 400 hours? Our technical skills, foundational concepts, and hands-on labs will land you that entry-level cybersecurity role you’ve dreamed about. Apply now

NexGenT Welcomes Michael LaMarche, Career Success Coach

NexGenT Welcomes Michael LaMarche, Career Success Coach

Michael is a Career Services and Success Coach who comes to NexGenT with professional recruiting experience and a background in higher education career services. Michael holds a Bachelor of Arts in Employee Relations and a Master’s in Organizational Performance and Technology from SUNY Potsdam.

Michael started the first seven of his fourteen-year career journey in the recruiting field in industries including healthcare, investment banking, IT, engineering, and consulting. Michael’s greatest achievement in the corporate sector was the placement of 1,100 employees during his tenure, which earned him a national ranking for his high level of successful employee placement. He then transitioned into higher education and joined Syracuse University. Over a seven-year career span, Michael had a very successful career. He was formerly the Director of Career Services which had oversight of 11 schools and colleges for 20,000+ students. His primary responsibility was developing strategic initiatives that would improve the student experience, increase retention rates, build corporate partnerships, and improve job placement outcomes. During his time at Syracuse University, he set three university records by achieving an 85% job placement rate for graduating classes of 3,300 students in 2017, 2018, and 2019.

Michael is extremely passionate about working with students and assisting them in achieving their career goals. His general philosophy is that he addresses each student individually so that he can help meet their specific needs and goals. He listens to their thoughts, works with them to pave new opportunities, and guides and supports students in developing a successful career path. In this way, he serves as a coach, mentor, and knowledgeable resource that works to maximize each individual’s potential for a successful future.

A fun fact about Michael is that he wrestled during his younger years. After seven months of training, he decided to skip his high school graduation to participate in the National High School Championships where he successfully placed 2nd and earned All-American status.


About NexGenT Career Service

Our NexGenT Career Service team works with you to develop your job attainment skills. We do this by first analyzing your individual strengths and weaknesses to build a custom career development plan. Your job success is so important that we dedicate a Career Success Coach to meet with you 1:1 to ensure you’re on track to reach your personal goals. Your Career Success Coach works with you to master each career milestone of a professional resume, cover letter, IT or cybersecurity interview preparation, a professional LinkedIn profile, and ultimately, a job and career success plan.

We look forward to helping you level up and achieve your career goals!

If you aren’t already a student, apply for NexGenT’s Full Stack Network Engineer program here or NexGenT’s Cyber Security Specialist program here!